Barwon Mould Remediation Help Save our Build. Twice. Part I

So far, the Eco-friendly, Allergy-free House project has been through 2 winters; the first winter, in 2016, before full external lock-up, almost completely disabled, laid flat with exhaustion and headaches, I was living/existing in one of those mouldy rentals from hell; we were behind time with the build; so many things haven’t gone as planned; however, disasters have been averted, and for that I’m grateful. Over the last year, to be almost exact, I’ve been onsite, pottering away in the eco-friendly, allergy free house, without mould symptoms. Soaking up the sun’s rays while indoors; often thinking about one thing: mould. The house has been at a standstill while the outside is prepared: concrete etc. to keep the build clean while indoor work happens. This is what happened leading up to stage 3, where we’re at now:

Keeping my eye on the weather:  we wrapped the top floor of our house in plastic to stop water coming in. We had wrapped the house in Kingspan, a breathable wrap that also acts as a light thermal break.

Plastic used was the water barrier type

Plastic used was the water barrier type

The plastic worked for two storms that pelted the house with relentless rain until, along with strong winds, water came pouring in off the whole western side of plastic wrap as it flapped its way in and out on stormy winds, wetting the concrete and the adjoining floor-level hardwood house frame. It had to be dried and cleaned up, pronto. I thought that would be it, because I aired religiously, had heaters and fans running but when I saw grey fur growing up the wall in the bathroom, which was confirmed by our remediater, Darin, from Barwon Restoration Services.  It gave me such a fright to see mould in the build like that. I pictured myself living in my car… Then took immediate action:

When Barwon Restoration Services came over to give us a free quote, Darin, said our house was by far one of the least damaged buildings he’d seen that winter and one of the cleanest, and that:

“Buildings that sit unfinished over winter can have huge mould problems.”

Darin explained that as the weather turned to August, and mould grew on hardwood of the bathroom, it, being as thin as plywood, and on the north side, the moisture within the building must have been absorbed, and unable to dry, and then, once the weather reached 22c plus, mould grew.

Mouldy

Mould grew fast, and under perfect conditions

It happened so fast, it seemed. (Approximately ten days after water entry. And that mould grew over just 3 days, turning black before we even managed to change it! (I was checking and airing the house on most days, what, with all that rain.) With Darin’s advice, Dan replaced the materials that had mould on them, leaving the bathroom looking clean once again. But was it?

HouseUSBathroom2016-08-14 12.02.04 HDR

The bathroom with hardwood materials removed and replaced, rather than an attempt at cleaning them

In my view, it would have been impossible to clean mould that was half way into the wood.

Each area of the house, a biological reading was taken: it was cheaper than a mould test.

DSC069361

Moisture reader. This is the reading of the corner-but window’s reveal (not water-damaged) that looked the worst, yet it was still low compared to water-damaged areas.

Any area that was black and gave a reading was replaced. Areas that appeared clean but gave a reading were cleaned. Areas of moisture concern were dried out using fans and heaters. We replaced around 12 pieces of wood. And went through so many cleaning rags, 3 vacuums (1 was stolen) 4 bottles of dishwashing liquid and some peroxide in particular areas.

The Clean Up

The mould clean up began. Even Darin said that if I didn’t have such a sensitivity to mould, it would be overkill for most people. More importantly, to me though, what if it wasn’t? Lol, and I thought I was losing my mind over mould then. (It felt like impending disaster.) Oh, and then Dan bought a bottle of Concrobium from Bunnings, cause you know, we all want a product that will just magically make it disappear; it was recommended not to use it based on the idea that the remediation company never used biocides with occupants who have compromised immune systems. The Concrobium went in the bin. Close call, there!

Early on, Darin had been most receptive of the Shoemaker research, doctor’s letters and my explanation of what mould had done to my life and the lengths I now had to go to avoid it. Thankfully, he understood that I wouldn’t be able to live there if mould took over the house. Dan would have an investment but I’d have no home! Between the three of us, we worked out a remediation clean up that wouldn’t make me sick:

Dan and I suited up and did the clean up ourselves. Our only mistake was not taping around the edge of the cuffs of the tyvek suits and Hunter boots, and double set of nitrile gloves, but other than that, we masked up and did alright!:

HouseBreakingBad

Breaking Mould

We didn’t even use Barwon Restoration Service‘s products, instead, based on their advice, using our dishwashing liquid; a particular percentage of peroxide; a huge bag of white throw away rags from Costco; and more dishwashing liquid for the wipe up of the whole upstairs, instead, paying attention to the bathroom and other immediate areas.

It’s a dangerous thing, dead mould.

Peroxide is dangerous too, because dead spores break up into fragments, can become embedded in your belongings, and, given the right, moist environment, can possibly desecrate your life. We then used sabco cloths and a HEPA vacuum to clean up any remaining spores.

(This is a true story; it’s happened to myself and many others who either have faulty HLA’s (human leukocyte antigens) and/or have lived in a water damaged building (WDB).

For education’s sake, my HLA’s are 4, 7, 2 and 8, which, using the Australian version of  ‘My House Makes me Sick HLA calculator‘ and the results of my blood test, computes to this:

4-3-53 – Multisusceptible/Chronic Fatigue

7-2-53 – Mold Susceptible

7-3-53 – Mold Susceptible). 

Had I have known that this was only the first of many clean ups to come, I’d have thrown myself on the floor, curling up into foetal position, hands over my eyes so I couldn’t see the HEPA vacuum looking back at me. This was the 2nd and the last mould clean up I took part in. Spraying peroxide and wiping each area with only one wipe of a clean cloth, then another one with straight up detergent was a royal pain in the backside. However, we were able to save money doing this part ourselves. The reason I refuse to do it again is I now know how sick mould can make me.

We used air washing, using cross-ventilation and sea winds to clear the house in the coming weeks.

Feeling a bit like a superhero with a biology degree in mould, through the build, I was able to purchase a water reader for around $80, very basic; and a thermal imaging camera. I spent many hours at the house, checking for air leaks where water vapour could get through, or worse, water… I lost sleep over the build everytime it rained, unless I was there. So I went and stayed there, spending many nights checking for water entry when it was raining, I thought I was going nuts, so it was good to get biological readings on any suspect timber over the next few months. Finally, it was at lock up and all windows and doors were flashed, keyed and securely in.

A clean build is a safe build

A clean build is a safe build. So is one that’s at lock up!

Mould Entry no.2

It was September 2016, nearly a year ago.

Come November, one morning, after sleeping there during wet weather—yet again—I did my usual rounds, clattering ladder  behind me, moisture reader and thermal imager in the front pocket of my overalls. To my horror, one of the hardwood window ledges had a pool of water on it. No moisture reader needed! I couldn’t believe my eyes. This area faced south; where the heavy rain and south westerlies come in.

window leak

(Our UPVC (the ‘u’ stands for ‘un-plasticised’) windows were made in Germany but when they arrived, one window didn’t quite fit, so we had one from an Australian company placed into that space. It looked the same. Until it leaked.) It took a few weeks to get the window removed so the area could be remediated. I think I counted the minutes of those few weeks.

We had to prove where the water was coming in so they could take responsibility. That’s the thing when working on a house yourself, if something goes wrong, you need to trace it back to the person responsible and everyone says it’s everyone else’s fault. We didn’t know if it was the flashing, the structure of the timber or the window itself. The thermal imaging camera gave the answer to that question: the thermally-broken chamber was taking in and holding water, which then leaked out slowly into the building via the window reveal:

MouldWindowLeak2016-10-13-14.53.28-2

Once again on advice from our remediatior, we waited until just before sundown, when the temperature drops outside, leaving any trapped water within the building envlope at a higher temperature.

2016-10-22 23.16.06-1

Image taken after another rainy night. This time the chamber is full on the left. It would leak out slowly onto the wooden reveal

The inside of a window’s thermally broken chamber looks like this:

A piece of thermally broken window frame used for testing

A piece of thermally-broken UPVC window frame, used to test for suitability

(Image is not the brand that leaked, rather the one I’d tested for suitability early on in the planning stages.)

One wrong product or chemical used in the build could make it unlivable. Mould, impossibly so.

Once it was established how the water was getting in and who was responsible, the window was removed. By then it looked like this:

WindowFail2016-10-26 19.45.24

The mould that was visible was not half as worrysome as the mould that couldn’t be seen

During remediation, the above area was sanded back. To replace the materials, it was a matter of pulling apart the outside wall of the house. Darin came over and promptly sealed off the area using Grunt plastic. But not before he generously assisted Dan in boarding up the hole in the south facing wall: the area needed to be as air tight as possible for the pressurised room where the window had leaked. It was only a little mould. Should be fine being only small amount, right? We all thought so.

HouseMouldRemediation2016-10-28 20.44.05

This room has been wrapped, pressurised and set up with a HEPA air scrubber, ready for cleaning

Also of concern: The hardwood reveal in the corner-but window (next to the above window) had black dots all over it. Due to my recent CIRS diagnosis, we needed to know if it was mould: it gave a reading of 180. Anything over 60-80 wasn’t good. Rather than clean that area, we opted to replace that piece of hardwood also. This way, it was a sure thing! Better to be safe than sorry, and we were on a budget: a mould test wasn’t out of budget but we did have to chose where to spend money: materials and HEPA scrubbers or testing and remediation of materials and HEPA scrubbers?

After the room was remediated, cleaned and I’d stayed away for a few weeks, I returned and all was fine. I was symptom free. The window reveal had been painted in clear Safecoat. (I did, however, return the night the air scrubbers were cleaning the house. I would have to say that was the most intense mould reaction I’ve ever had. And I got it walking into the property, from the front yard. The air being expelled from the house was blown in my face by the wind. My face and hands felt like they were on fire. I actually thought the house was sure to be ruined considering the reaction of my skin!)

However, a few months later, I noticed the paint was bubbling up. This meant there was moisture, possibly mould, in the wood. Still! All other reveals were fine. Our indoor remediation had not been for nothing: it was an important learning experience: it’s better to the replace mouldy materials than remediate them, where possible.

Darin: 0498 777 131
John: 0412 777 193

Next, in Part II: Our back deck, shockingly, needs remediation: we have to replace our whole back deck after the hardwood supporting beams are now black with mould—as is the MgO board, which was yet to be sealed or waterproofed.

2016-09-24 09.52.44

Note how the back of the house is sealed with plastic. It’s called ‘containment’

More

Toxic Mould Support Australia: Remove, Don’t Kill Mould – Part 1 – Building Materials

Michellina Van Loder is a Professional Writer, Journalist and Blogger. This is where she shares her tales about trail blazing her way out of the Labyrinth of Chemical Sensitivities and Mould. This is also where you will find the latest Research on related topics.

Hidden Housemates: meet the moulds growing in your home

This article was originally published at The Conversation

Michael Taylor, Flinders University

Home alone? Hardly. Our homes are positively swarming with creatures of all kinds. In our new series, we’ll be profiling the “hidden housemates” that live with us.

Our offices and homes are full of airborne spores from fungi, and for the most part we never even notice them.

Whether you like to think about it or not, you’re covered in microorganisms. Absolutely teeming with them from head to toe. Your body is covered and filled with bacteria called commensals, which inhabit the microscopic valleys of your skin and recesses of your gut. These organisms for the most part never cause you any harm, and in fact protect you from being colonised by disease-causing organisms.

In the same way that you’re a walking zoo of microbes, the world around you is peppered with invisible microorganisms.

Ancient relationship

This isn’t a new relationship though. Humans have been cohabiting with fungi for a very long time.

Ancient Egyptian bakers and brewers were harnessing natural yeasts more than 4,000 years ago, but it was only in the 1850s that we realised it was microbes that were responsible for leavening bread and making alcohol.

We’ve also known for a very long time that unpreserved foods spoil, growing conspicuously fuzzy tufts of blue and green mould. The kinds of moulds that make our bread and make forgotten oranges go fluffy are really the weeds of the fungal world.

Penicillium (this is the same fungus involved in the discovery of the first antibiotics, but that’s another story) and Aspergillus are the microscopic equivalent of soursobs and dandelions, and look fairly similar in a lot of ways.

Aspergillus niger, the fungal dandelion
Michael Taylor

Penicillium, the source of the antibiotic penicillin
Michael Taylor

Walk through any park, or into any building the world over and you’ll probably be picking up spores from Penicillium and Aspergillus; up to a several hundred per cubic metre of air is normal. In fact when you’re looking at indoor fungi, if you don’t find these two floating around you often question if you’ve taken your samples correctly.

Is your house ‘killing you’?

Indoor airborne fungi have become implicated in “sick building syndrome” and claims that our homes are “killing us”.

There is some sense mixed in with the scare here. These kinds of organisms can colonise our houses and cause serious illness but it’s unlikely that you’re in imminent danger.

Mould becomes a problem when there is moisture, or the inability for it to escape. After large rainfall or flood events, porous materials in buildings like wood, insulation, carpet and furnishings absorb a lot of water.

This water can then support the growth of fungi and fill cavities and hidden areas with very humid and stagnant air – perfect conditions for problem moulds such as Stachybotrys, the toxic black mould.

Stachybotrys, or Black mould
Unknown

If your bathroom is looking like this, you may have a problem…
Black mould image from www.shutterstock.com

Most of the time though the fungi that turn up after water damage shouldn’t poison you or cause infection, but will probably smell musty and cause allergy-like symptoms until the problem is fixed.

In many cases fixing the root cause may be relatively simple, with the first step always being to ensure that whatever caused the water to accumulate is fixed and any excess moisture is dried out. Non-porous surfaces are often simply able to be wiped clean of all visible mould with a detergent or cleaning spray.

Soft furnishings, clothes and carpets should be thoroughly vacuumed and washed if possible, or thrown out if extensively contaminated. Porous surfaces are increasingly more difficult as wiping the surface clean may not actually remove the mould and will likely need to be replaced to fully solve the problem. Extensively damaged homes after a flood may be beyond remediation, and any clean-up operations on this scale should always involve a professional.

But it’s not just leaky roofs that encourage fungi to come indoors though, our push towards ultra-efficient green buildings can cause similar problems.

To reduce energy costs, we often design our air-conditioning systems to recycle as much of the indoor air as possible, which over the course of the day can slowly push up carbon dioxide and moisture in the air.

If this isn’t removed, it can leave you feeling sleepy and the air feeling heavy whilst providing an opportunity for fungi to take over.

The fungal garden in your home

We’re often told to aim for a lifestyle with “balance”. The same is true for our microscopic housemates.

If you end up with one single species dominating you may have a problem. On the other hand a mixture of species shows that everything is relatively in order and is an indicator of a healthy environment.

The mixture of airborne fungi does change from place to place, but not as dramatically as you’d expect. The same specimens tend to turn up the world over: Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium, alongside a handful of other common fungi.

If you live near agricultural pastures, you may find a greater abundance of plant pathogens like Alternaria, Stemphylium and Fusarium. The species may change if you’re in different regions of the world, but overall your lungs probably contain similar spores to your relatives in Spain or Japan.

If you live in California’s San Joaquin Valley, however, you are in the unlucky position of being tens of thousands of times more likely to be exposed to infectious spores from the fungi Coccidioides immitis, which cause the otherwise relatively rare condition of fungal pneumonia.

But if it makes you uncomfortable to think about the invisible world pulsing with life around you, relax. Generally a healthy mixture of fungi can indicate a healthy home, and I promise you that life is better with fungi in it than without.

Are you a researcher with an idea for a “hidden housemates” story? Get in touch.

The Conversation

Michael Taylor, Lecturer, School of the Environment, Flinders University

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Michellina Van Loder is a Professional Writer, Journalist and Blogger. This is where she shares her tales about trail blazing her way out of the Labyrinth of Chemical Sensitivities and Mould. This is also where you will find the latest Research on related topics.

CIRS diagnosis

(Note this post has been updated as it was full of grammatical errors, including ‘Lime’ instead of ‘Lyme’, which the personal acknowledgment of this public mistake has shown me that I’ve evolved as a writer; whereas once I would have been curled up in the foetal position, sucking on my thumb, ruminating on the humiliation of it all, I can now laugh about it.)

First, the elephant in the room:

What I liked about Dr Little was he was always right about everything, except for this one thing (I hope. Because if with this CIRS diagnosis, I can actually recover. Fully.). Something else I liked about seeing Dr Little, apart from the payback of good health when, way back in 04′, I took the leap, making major changes to my living arrangements and use of chemical-irritant based personal care products (such as my beloved fragrances) and practicing avoidance of allergens in my living space, was the way how if I went in there with some internet research, like the time one reader, A Country Woman Paints (check out her paintings. Hell! Buy one, even!), suggested that I had Mask Cell Disorder (based on one photo of a butterfly shaped rash that often appears for no apparent reason on my face (all other rashes have traceable reasons but not that one), when I showed him the photo, although he doubted I had it based on my other symptoms, he still tested for it. And, no! Dear Adelaide, I didn’t have it; but thank you so much for caring enough to suggest it xx. (Having a diagnosis, the knowledge of what is wrong with your body is like owning the map showing the way out of the Labyrinth of chemical sensitivities; for me, anyway.)  However, he would also run tests for other, more likely things, like Heliobactor. Immunology, I get it. And it’s very important, a fundamental element of chemical sensitivities.

Dr Little has been very helpful for my Inhalant Allergies. Now, if I’ve had CIRS all along, that’s okay, there’s no ill will because the credible research into this condition, which is basically, mould illness, is less than 5 years old; and it’s not his field. So don’t go blaming my favourite, number one, most respected, doctor (ever!), Mum!

He wrote me this letter to get people to understand about the ‘the Build an Eco-Friendly, Allergy-Free House‘ Project. He sorted out every food intolerance; and stopped me from chasing natural therapies that may or may not have worked but would have cost a bomb! I’m so grateful for his help over the last 14 years. And I will be running this diagnosis by his expert eye as a second opinion and blogging about it, of course as soon as I can :)

But the last 4 years, I’ve just been sitting back while I get sicker to the point of now needing a carer.

My suspected diagnosis, before 17 blood tests, an MRI with the additional NeuroQuant element, which automatically segments and measures volumes of brain structures and compares these volumes to norms, was instigated on my first appointment with Dr Mark Donohoe and was immediately suspected as CIRS.

“I don’t present as the average patient with MCS,” he said. I guess it’s that part where I am better with new items and can’t have old things, I’m not too sure.

The MRI was ordered fragrance free by Dr Donohoe. The clinic staff at Imaging Associates in Box Hill did an awesome job, making it so I could come in early in the morning before any patients were there leaving fragrance molecules in the air or on the equipment.

Is an MRI dangerous for someone sensitive to chemicals? Not for me.

If you were as sick as what I was, am, have been, you will say yes to medical intervention, if you had your right mind. However, could this be done if a person has EHS (Electrochypersensitivity, closely linked with MCS); and denied even more furtively over the years using Barret citations (the Quackhead from Quackwatch who was involved as a psychiatrist in research proven quackery in itself). An alleged Bastard Child of Medicine who even more allegedy didn’t even pass the bar exam!, therefore was never even certified. Allegedly.

I enjoyed the MRI scan as you can see below!

I have no knowledge of Lyme, and have yet to do any research on it; I’ve only ever had one tick bite back in 88′ in the NSW bush but don’t think this is related. Dr Donohoe said it’s more indicative of another type of bacterial infection, which is yet not clear. I already know my main issue is mould; and he agrees with me! I’m not a doctor, obviously, sitting here in my yoga pants, on oxygen, music blaring, feeling great: I just had 2 days in fresh air. See! My symptoms clear when in clean, dry weather.

I got to mop the upstairs Modakboard (MgO board) floor of the new house during our last warm spell. I used boiling hot water and borax. I’m running some fans for circulation downstairs and upstairs. 2 days fresh air! Is all it took to bring me back to normal and I can still feel it, Plus, it rained today and I didn’t get sick, ‘Punched in the nose, face pulsating pain from sinuses kind of sick’; but I know it won’t be long until winter hits and I’m under the same amount of pain again as the last 4 winters since living in 2 WDB.

So these are screen captures of the scans:

My NeouroQuant MRI scan done at 'Imagining Associates' in Box Hill, Melbourne, Australia

My NeouroQuant MRI scan done at ‘Imagining Associates’ in Box Hill, Melbourne, Australia

And massive note: you can’t get a Neuroquant MRI just at any MRI place. As far as I know, there is only this one place, Imagining Associates at Box Hill who do this. For more information there’s a wonderfully helpful but private FaceBook Group called Toxic Mould Support Australia; they also have a website with the latest information.

And now, my numbers put through this handy spreadsheet:

My-mould-assesment-for-internet

Which translates in Doctor’s speak as the request for MRI:

NeuroQuant MRI at Box Hill for Mould and Lyme (meaning other bacterial infection)

NeuroQuant MRI at Box Hill for Mould, and Lyme (meaning other bacterial infection)

By the end of the day, we had been to Costco, which was fun as always. Rare fun, Enclosed in my 3M mask, which covers my face and then a scarf, which I often let fall in my shopping frenzy. But later… Sometimes, if going near fragrance, I have to wear the scarf. But it was after that Costco visit my day turned dark. While visiting people I became sick because of others who came wearing fragrance, and then another. I’m treated like I don’t exist and they don’t have to not tell people they can’t come in because Misha is visiting, It was that visit where I took off my mask and got sick from kissing the face of fragrance face cream, Nivea or some other stuff: the taste of it lingers in my memory.

I might just go to Costco next time. I’m not seeing anyone who uses fragrance products anymore, it’s just too hard and my heart hurts when they get it wrong, which is actually more difficult to deal with than the actual pain and recovery.

Having the Neoroquant MRI at Image Associates Box Hill was a fun, relaxing experience as you can see:

Yeah, so I have moderate mould sickness. I still have no bricky who can start for another 12 days. And I say the ominously, winter is coming. My house is framed with wood and I can’t afford for it to get wet. We are going to try to wrap it in more plastic. But I’m worried about breathability.

It’s so hard to ring around for help when you’re not well. It’s like days get wiped off the calendar. I can’t think straight when I’m not well or I’m in this house.

My rental didn’t turn out. But on the positive: we found a great duct cleaner who went truly fragrance free. He only used tea-tree oil anyway. But I told him I needed no scent. He used new equipment. I’ll post it on another spot for easy reference but for now, it’s Mark’s Duct Cleaning in Melbourne.

Mark’s Duct Cleaning. True Fragrance Free Duct Cleaning. Cost an unnecessary bomb.

The new house didn’t work out because the fragrance made me sick when I put the heating on. I have to pay rent, or my carer does because I can’t pay two rents until they find another tenant. He offered to pay two weeks rent but after that he wants to take it to the rental tribunal, breaking the lease based on medical necessity and hardship.

So I’m stuck in this mouldy house, which I’m grateful for, and at times, happy here. But as soon as it rains or there’s damp weather (Oh! With woodsmoke also), I suffer greatly. One thing I’ve been doing differently is the kale juice, which I can hardly believe I’m doing. Possibly because I’m not; my carer does it. I just drink it.

Daily vitamin: kale and apple juice with turmeric and ginger. #kale #juice #dailyvitamin #thrivingplantbased @bananablondie108 #vegan

A photo posted by Michellina (@michellinaoutofthelabyrinth) on

I’ve just done an ERMI with the Mould Lab, also a seperate post worth publishing at the Labyrinth

And I’m finding hanging out over at the new build okay so long as it’s dry. Kind of like a big tree house; one that we need, must keep dry but well ventilated.

Yeah, so we need a bricky in the Bellarine, Surf Coast Area. As ours quit. We have a new bricky ready to go in 2 weeks.

More
Mould Lab for mould testing of furnishings so you don’t take mould with you. Only if you are extremely sensitive to it, which I am. So I know I’m already ditching a lot of stuff. But I am using evidence based methods to make the decision. This time!

I’m using an Ausclimate Dehumidifier to dry the air in this place. I also bought at DeLongi (for the rental. Yes. It reeks of carpet fumes and fragrance!) However, we are still using it in the room with the old water damage to the ceiling, which I can’t allow our landlord to fix while I’m living here. I’m reluctant to look for a new place. I cannot describe the pain an anguish living with mould illness except to say:

It’s like you’re meditating, doing yoga, relaxed thoughts, and a cloud descends over you. Your chest feels heavy. And then you realise it’s mould. Your energy is zapped by mould. It’s insidiously cruel with your short-term memory. You wouldn’t want to be around people you can’t trust. Or people who’re not kind, actually.

The good news. CIRS has a treatment but you have to move out of WDB first. So there’s that again.

You can read more, here: Surviving Mould DownUnder

The NeuroQuant element of the MRI, which is done at Cortechs Laboratories in the US

And was done at Imaging Associates at Box Hill, Victoria, Australia

And the wonderful Toxic Mould Australia Support Group here

The Latest (June 2016): Ready to Cure CIRS: A Low-Amylose Diet

Michellina Van Loder is a Professional Writer, Journalist and Blogger. This is where she shares her tales about trail blazing her way out of the Labyrinth of Chemical Sensitivities and Mould. This is also where you will find the latest Research on related topics.

Information, products and views presented by guest bloggers @The Labyrinth are not necessarily the same as those held by this blog's author, Michellina van Loder. Reviews are my own personal opinions (unless stated otherwise); and satire is used throughout personal posts. Any health topics discussed are not to be taken as medical advice. Seek out medical attention if needed and do your own research; however, you're welcome to use mine as a start.
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